A leisurely stroll, a brisk walk or a picturesque ramble when walking the dog, there’s lots of beautiful places to visit when walking in Sunderland. 

 

Perfect for dog walkers in Sunderland or those just wanting to enjoy springtime in the North East, take a look at our guide of the top picturesque walks in Sunderland…

Featured image: Martin Burdon

Herrington Country Park & Penshaw Monument

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the largest parks in Sunderland with tons of serene walks and exhilarating cycle trails. 

It’s home to many exciting events like the Sunderland Festival, Race for Life and has even hosted the National Cross Country Championships, Radio 1 Big Weekend, The BIG Bike Ride and the 2012 Olympic Torch Celebration in the past. 

If you’re able to manage a steep ascent, the short walk to Penshaw Monument is a must-do for any Wearside rambler.

One of our city’s most iconic landmarks, Penshaw Monument is based on the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, is to locals, their symbol of ‘home.’

Same goes for us Mackems too!

 

Washington Wetland Centre 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Washington Wetland Centre lies on the banks of the River Wear and provides an inspirational example of how sound conservation management allows wildlife to thrive in the midst of a largely urban landscape. 

Here, members of the public can get close to nature and learn more about wetland itself. It’s a brilliant walk in Sunderland with the little ones when the sun is out! 

With the WWT Washington centre itself currently closed, just remember to check their reopening times and keep updated with any safety precautions for when they do open back up by following the link below: 

 

wwt.org.uk/wetland-centres/washington

 

The Sculpture Trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: See It Do It Sunderland

 

The Sculpture Trail, running along the final part of the Coast to Coast was created over a decade from 1991 to 2001 by sculptor Colin Wilbourn and writer Chaz Brenchley.

Colin and Chaz worked with residents of Sunderland to create the trail which brings together Sunderland’s past and present. 

Around the plinth of ‘Shadows in Another Light’ are plaques showing the history of Sunderland, including the Lambton Worm, which were created in workshops by blind and partially sighted people.

The trail includes a ‘shadow’ of a hammerhead crane common in Sunderland shipyards, and ‘Taking Flight’ which shows a Cormorant taking flight in five stages.

 

High Wood 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A stunning short walk taking in beautiful oak woodland, riverside vistas and what is quite possibly the best view in Sunderland! 

High Wood rests on the north bank of a large loop in the River Wear.

It is an ancient woodland consisting of hawthorn, oak, beech and ash species and is also home to a rich variety of bird life including great spotted woodpecker, bullfinch and sparrowhawk.

Be sure to take your camera and tag us in your snaps when you’re out and about!

 

Coastal Walk along Roker Pier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roker Pier Roker Pier and lighthouse were built between 1883 and 1903, and has since developed into an incredibly popular landmark to visit, especially during our lockdown walks.

Did you know, an underground tunnel runs along the length of the pier and this was built to help servicemen access gain to the lighthouse in bad weather!

To the north east of the pier lies the wreckage of a German U Boat, which sank in February 1917 after accidentally mining itself.

This fascinating walk along the River Wear is accessibility-friendly and packed with culture and history both ancient and modern – ideal for those wanting to learn more about Sunderland’s rich heritage! 

Although Roker Pier itself is currently closed, a brisk walk along the golden sands at Roker is a fabulous way to see one of Sunderland’s most iconic landmarks!

 

Coxgreen 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This walk will let you explore the heavily wooded, picturesque setting of Cox Green and Fatfield, taking in the lovely open countryside near Offterton. 

In the 19th century this area was a hive of activity as a result of the coal trade, local ship building and quarrying industries.

Coal was carried by wagons down to the river to keel boats which would then transport the coal on to awaiting ships close to the mouth of the river.

A great walk for those wanting to escape from the hustle and bustle of city life.

 


 

Stay in touch with the latest Sunderland news and updates. Twitter: @SunderlandVibe, Instagram: @SunderlandVibe, Facebook: @SunderlandVibe

 

Facebook Comments